IMAGE First Light Movies and Images


[HENA image] Energetic Neutral Atom image of a storm cloud of energetic particles from the High Energy Neutral Atom Imager instrument. Red colors indicate the highest intensity of incoming particles, blue represents the lowest. We are looking from the sun towards the Earth, viewing the cloud beyond the Earth on the night side. This is a selected frame from a sequence which is available as a quicktime movie.

0.9 Mb TIFF Version of the Image

Quicktime Movie (1.9 Mb)



[Empire State Building image] The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on IMAGE is the first-of-its-kind instrument designed to study the dynamics of the magnetosphere by using radar techniques. In order to generate very low frequency radio waves and to receive the resulting echoes, RPI uses very long dipole antennas. IMAGE has 2 spin-plane dipole antennas (along the spacecraft X and Y axis) and one spin-axis dipole antenna (along the spacecraft Z axis). The X and Y axis antennas are 1647 ft or 500 meters tip-to-tip each. These antennas are 182 ft longer than the height of the Empire State Building, making the IMAGE spacecraft the largest dipole antenna system currently in space. The IMAGE spin-axis dipole antenna is about 66 feet long or 20 meters tip-to-tip in length (not shown). The octagon shaped IMAGE spacecraft measures 7.4 ft in diameter by 4.9 ft in height with the antennas retracted, and weighs 1,089 lbs. This is a selected frame from a sequence which is available as a quicktime movie.

2.7 Mb TIFF Version of the Image

Quicktime Movie (0.1 Mb)



[Plasmasphere echoes image] Depth sounding of the tenuous extension of the Earth's upper ionosphere about 20,000 kilometers into space around the Earth, called the plamasphere, using the Radio Plasma Imager instrument. The green traces correspond to echoes from the plasmasphere at varying depths.

0.5 Mb TIFF Version of the Image



[Plasmasphere image] Ultraviolet image of sunlight scattered from the Earth's extended atmosphere of helium using the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager instrument. This image shows that the ionized helium atmosphere extends to about 2 - 3 times the size of the Earth. Irregularities at the fringe of the image, such as the upper left, indicate magnetic storm activity. This is the first time such features have been imaged. This is a selected frame from a sequence which is available as a quicktime movie.

3.6 Mb TIFF Version of the Image

Quicktime Movie (1.6 Mb)



[EUV aurora image] Ultraviolet image of the aurora at the peak of a small space storm using the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imager instrument on IMAGE. Brighter green corresponds to brighter auroral light. The view is towards the earth's night side, and the detailed, highly turbulent region near midnight reveals storm activity in the magnetic field surrounding Earth. This is a selected frame from a sequence which is available as a quicktime movie.

3.6 Mb TIFF Version of the Image

Quicktime Movie (1.6 Mb)



[Aurora substorm image] Aurora are caused by the interaction of precipitating charged particles (electrons and ions) with the neutral gases of our atmosphere. Light from the Earth's aurora occur principally in two oval-shaped bands lying between ~65 and 75 degrees magnetic latitude and centered on the northern (aurora borealis) and southern (aurora australis) magnetic poles. IMAGE observes the aurora in several important wavelengths and has captured its first geomagnetic substorm. These observations are caused by precipitating electrons. This is a selected frame from a sequence which is available as a quicktime movie.

240 kb TIFF Version of the Image

Quicktime Movie (1.0 Mb)



[Proton aurora image] Auroral emissions are excited principally by electron precipitation. We know that some of the auroral emissions are produced by precipitating protons but up until now have never observed a "proton aurora" from space. IMAGE is the first spacecraft to measure the proton aurora.

2.8 Mb TIFF Version of the Image



[Proton/electron aurora comparison image] With IMAGE we can now simultaneously observe the proton and electron induced aurora. The image of the aurora on the left is from precipitating protons, in the center from precipitating electrons, and on the right from combined protons and electrons. The overlay to the right shows green where the electron aurora dominates, red where the proton aurora dominates, and yellow where both are comparable.

921 kb TIFF Version of the Image



IMAGE First Light Press Release

IMAGE Press Release Page

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Curators

Dr. E. V. Bell, II, ed.bell@nasa.gov, +1-301-286-1187
NSSDC, Mail Code 690.1, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771
NASA Official: Dr. Ed Grayzeck Rev. 1.0.2, 05 June 2000