Solar Storms and You!

Activity 9: A Soda Bottle Magnetometer....Data

Data taken between March 8-13, 1999 at NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center with the Mark 2 magnetometer by Dr. Sten Odenwald.

Solar conditions during this time:

3-8-99    Quiet         Bright Oval
3-9-99    Quiet       
3-10-99   Quiet         Weak Oval, with sub-storm over Siberia
3-11-99   Quiet         Weak Oval, sub-storm over Scandinavia
3-12-99   Disturbed     Weak Oval, no sub-storms evident
3-13-99   Quiet         No Oval
Note, the Quiet/Disturbed/Active index used at the Space Weather site is rather crude. In several instances a 'Quiet' condition was posted even though the 'Current View' image of the Earth from space by the POLAR satellite clearly showed the ring-shaped oval of auroral activity in progress over Alaska and Canada. In the next data runs I will indicate both the posted condition, and the strength of the 'auroral oval' on a scale B=Bright, W=weak and A=absent. In the following, all times are in local Eastern Standard Time. Data:
3-8-99
9:00    15.0 s
10:00    8.0 s
10:25    8.0 s
10:50    7.5 s
11:10    7.0 s
11:25    6.5 s
11:55    7.0 s
13:30    5.0 s
14:05    5.0 s
14:30    6.0 s
15:00    5.0 s
15:25    4.0 s
16:45    3.5 s
17:00    3.0 s
17:20    5.0 s

3-9-99
    No Data Taken....Not in office

3-10-99
11:35    7.0 s
12:05    7.0 s
13:15    6.0 s
13:35    7.0 s
14:20    7.0 s
14:55    6.5 s
15:25    6.5 s
16:20    6.0 s
17:00    5.0 s
17:10    4.5 s

3-11-99
9:05     5.5 o   +/- 1 cm
9:50     4.0 s
10:50    4.5 s
11:00    4.0 s
11:30    4.0 s
12:45    3.5 s
14:10    3.0 s
14:50    3.5 s
17:15    4.0 s

3-12-99
8:45     6.0 s
10:25    5.0 s
11:05    5.0 s
13:30    6.0 s
14:00    5.0 o  +/- 1 cm
15:00    5.0 o  +/- 1 cm
16:20    4.5 s
17:30    3.5 s

3-13-99
11:35    5.0 s

Notes:

Generally a quiet week. Most of the sub-storm activity that is seen by satellites in the daytime when I am making these measurements, is occurring, of course, in the distant parts of the world where its night time. We either need to get schools in Europe, Scandinavia or Russia participating, or we really need to get night-time observations in North America for our magnetometer stations. Of course, just because we can't SEE an aurora in the daytime,doesn't mean that the magnetic field is not unsteady just the same, and that a storm is occurring. Its just that we cannot get satellite confirmation of this very easily when North America and Canada are in daylight.

We found the two 'real-time' magnetometer stations at Kiruna, Sweden system and Flinders very helpful in corroborating the data taken.